Watch These 11 Titles Before They Leave Netflix This Month

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The popularity of “Yellowstone” reignited interest in this 1990 Oscar winner Kevin Costner for Best Picture and Best Director, who also explored the complicated relationship between Native Americans and white “settlers,” although only through a more explicit historical lens. Costner also stars as John J. Dunbar, a Union Army lieutenant at a remote outpost, who comes to sympathize with — and then essentially join — the Lakota tribe. The cinematography is gorgeous, the sets are grand and thrilling, and Costner strikes just the right note of resigned rebellion in the lead role.

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In 2014, directors Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg make a political dark comedy in which Rogen and James Franco travel to North Korea to interview Kim Jong-un and are hired by the CIA to assassinate him. And it came out, and everyone had a good laugh, the end. Just kidding: It was one of the most controversial films of the 2010s, its explosive premise sparking cyberattacks and terrorist threats on behalf of North Korea and a vigorous free speech debate after Sony Pictures relented and scuttled its mainstream release. In retrospect, that was a lot of trouble for what was, at its core, a very broad and silly movie. The film also had as much to say about American vanity and delusion as it did about the humanitarian crimes of the North Korean government.

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The phrase “ahead of their time” is rumored with abandon, but it certainly applies to Jim Henson’s 1980s production, which expanded its reach with non-Muppet, dark fantasy entertainment that was met with indifference. critical and commercial but which have gained considerably. followed by worship with the passing years. “The Dark Crystal” was an example; here’s another, a 1986 musical fantasy, made in collaboration with George Lucas, which Henson directed from a script by Monty Python member Terry Jones. Jennifer Connelly stars as a slightly spoiled teenager who embarks on a journey into a dark world to save her little brother; David Bowie is unforgettable, chilling and alluring as the Goblin King who stands in his way.

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In 1996, moviegoers turned out in droves to see a gripping story of Americans uniting and rising up against a terrible alien threat. That movie, of course, was “Independence Day”; this The film, a 1950s-style sci-fi comedy from director Tim Burton, was released six months later and relatively ignored. But the weather has been more favorable to Burton’s accidental parody than the flag-waving blockbuster it followed to market. “Independence Day” has aged like milk, while the many virtues of the shameless “Mars Attacks” have become more entertaining. These include a killer cast (Annette Bening, Pierce Brosnan, Glenn Close, Danny DeVito, Pam Grier, Michael J. Fox, Jack Nicholson, Sarah Jessica Parker, Natalie Portman, Martin Short and more), a cockeyed visual style and a climax featuring exploding alien brains and Slim Whitman records.

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Writer and director Jody Hill, best known for his work on the TV series ‘Eastbound and Down’ and ‘The Righteous Gemstones,’ made his studio debut with this dark and controversial 2009 comedy. A would-be cop bides his time as a mall security guard, but make no mistake, this isn’t “Paul Blart: Mall Cop.” Hill’s comedy is dark, bordering on nihilism, portraying its protagonist as a dangerous, delusional megalomaniac drunk on his (limited) power. And to its credit, the film doesn’t pull its punches, up to and including its revealing ending. Rogen has rarely been better, weaponizing his usual charisma and warmth to create a chilling (but funny!) portrayal of a borderline sociopath.

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